Blog

Ivan defends his MsC dissertation

Let’s congratulate Ivan on his brilliant masters dissertation defense. His dissertation’s title is “Winds and feedback from supermassive black holes accreting at low rates”. In this work, Ivan performed a suite of hydrodynamical simulations of hot accretion flows with a large dynamical range and long durations (comparable to the viscous timescale), aiming at better understanding black hole wind production and feedback in low-luminosity AGNs hosted by quiescent galaxies.

We have a paper coming out soon, where we will report the results of this work. Stay tuned!

From left to right: Diego Falceta Gonçalvez, Rodrigo Nemmen, Ivan de Almeida, Thaisa Storchi Bergmann and Roderik Overzier.

The evaluation committee was composed of Thaisa Storchi Bergmann, Roderik Overzier and Diego Falceta Gonçalvez.

This work was funded by a FAPESP scholarship, grant number 2016/24857-6. It has made use of the following computing facilities:

  • Laboratory of Astroinformatics (IAG/USP, NAT/Unicsul; FAPESP grant 2009/54006-4)
  • Aguia cluster, HPC resources of Universidade de São Paulo

Raniere visiting Torino to continue exploration of the unknown gamma-ray sky

Raniere will be visiting the University of Torino over the next year, working with Prof. Francesco Massaro, in order to continue our group’s research to understand the unidentified gamma-ray sources observed with Fermi Large Area Telescope. In particular, he will use a suite of optical observations to try to pinpoint the nature of such sources.

Raniere’s visit will be funded by a FAPESP BEPE scholarship, grant number 2018/24801-6.

GNU Scientific Library (GSL) partially ported to NVIDIA GPUs: cuSL

Recently, we embarked in the adventure of porting a “Monte Carlo radiative transfer in curved spacetimes” code from multi-threaded CPUs to GPUs. This work is important for three reasons:

  1. It is fun!
  2. It is important because most general relativistic radiative transfer procedures currently available neglect inverse Compton scattering, which is particularly important to the group since we want to understand the nonthermal emission of active galactic nuclei
  3. Radiative transfer can be slow; on the other hand, it can usually be made massively parallel with a couple of algorithmic improvements

These are some of the reasons why we decided to port a radiative transfer code to GPUs. We have reasons to believe that we can achieve speed-ups of a factor of ~100 times compared to a parallel, OpenMP (CPU) version of the code when using a modern GPU such as a GTX 1080 Ti. This can be a game-changer to allow faster modelling of the radiation from accreting black holes.

We are collaborating with colleagues from the computer science department at the university (Alfredo Goldmann and Matheus Tavares Bernardino). This is work in progress and we have some exciting preliminary results, which we unfortunately cannot publicly share yet. We hope to soon have a paper reporting these results and share the GPU-accelerated black hole radiative transfer code on Github.

In the meantime, we have one software deliverable from this project which may be useful for other researchers: we partially ported some functions of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) to CUDA. More specifically, we ported the following functions:

  • gsl_ran_dir_3d: generate random vectors in the 3D space
  • gsl_sf_bessel_K0_scaled_e, gsl_sf_bessel_K1_scaled_e, gsl_sf_bessel_Kn: different sorts of “exotic” Bessel functions
  • gsl_ran_chisq: generate random numbers drawn from the chi-square distribution
  • cheb_eval_e: Chebyshev polynomial
  • gsl_sf_lnfact_e, gsl_sf_fact_e: factorial
  • gsl_ran_gamma_double: Gamma distribution
  • gsl_sf_psi_int_e: Digamma (Psi) function
  • gsl_poly_eval: polynomial evaluation

We called this GSL CUDA-port cuSL. It is publicly available on Github. Hopefully, this may be useful to other researchers that are doing mathematical physics computations using CUDA and NVIDIA GPUs.

Roberta joins the group

Hi!
I’m Roberta Duarte Pereira and I’m a physicist graduated at IFSC-USP. I just started my master’s degree in the Black Hole Group at IAG-USP under the supervision of Prof. Rodrigo Nemmen.
Since my childhood, one of my main passions in life is Astronomy, mainly Black Holes because they are so interesting and they always fascinated me. During my time in undergrad course, Computational Physics also called my attention. So I decided to connect both of my passions.
Recently, I started a project – under the supervision of Professor Rodrigo—in astrophysical simulations with deep learning. It’s a project that may bring some new insights about how we see numerical simulations nowadays and we could gain so much in this area!
I’m very happy and greatly motivated with this project and also for being in the Black Hole Group.

Roberta will work on applying machine learning and deep learning to numerical simulations of black holes, in collaboration with João Paulo Navarro from NVIDIA.

Welcome aboard, Roberta! We are glad you chose to come work in our group, and excited for the discoveries in the computational universe that will come from your project.

Roberta Duarte Pereira and Rodrigo Nemmen

Group funded by FAPESP

We are very happy to announce that our research group is receiving a large, competitive grant from FAPESP (Jovem Pesquisador, R$415k, grant 2017/01461-2). Besides including funding to support the group’s computational needs, this grant includes 1 PhD, 1 MsC and 2 undergraduate scholarships.

415k reais may not look like much when converted to dollars, but this amount of funding is quite hard to get lately in Brasil, especially for junior faculty.

Fermi Symposium + Collaboration meeting + NASA GSFC visit

The PhD students of the group working on gamma-ray observations—Fabio and Raniere—spent the last two weeks in Washington DC and surroundings. They went to the Fermi LAT Collaboration meeting at George Washington University, where they interacted with gamma-ray astronomers in the Fermi Collaboration. Raniere presented his ongoing analysis of the gamma-ray emission of a population of nearby AGNs.

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Raniere de Menezes presenting his work on low-luminosity AGNs at the Fermi LAT Collaboration Meeting, Washington DC.

Following the Collaboration meeting, the students presented their research at the Fermi Symposium in Baltimore. Raniere presented a poster about his work on the pulsar populations in Milky Way globular clusters—which is about to be submitted for publication—while Fabio gave a talk describing his analysis of the gamma-ray emission from the Galactic Center on constraints on Sgr A* physics.

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Fabio Cafardo presenting his work on the gamma-ray emission of Sgr A* at the Fermi Symposium, Baltimore.

After the symposium, Fabio and Raniere spent a couple of days visiting NASA Goddard Space Flight Center to discuss their research with GSFC scientists.

Their visit was possible thanks to NASA funds, grant xxxxxx.

Undergrad working on GPU research advances to international phase of research symposium

Matheus Tavares Bernardino, an undergraduate student working in our group, presented his work on the acceleration of black hole radiative transfer with OpenACC in GPUS at the undergraduate science symposium at USP and now will compete in the international phase of the symposium which will happen in November.

Congratulations, Matheus!

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Matheus (right) and collaborator Alfredo Goldmann (left) happily showcasing the poster

Course on General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics by Yosuke Mizuno

Yosuke Mizuno (Goethe University, Frankfurt) taught an advanced course on general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics on August 13-17 at our institute. General relativistic magnetohydrodynamics—or GRMHD—is an essential tool to model high-energy astrophysical phenomena such as accreting black holes and relativistic jets—precisely the type of phenomena that our group loves and cherishes. This course was very useful for everybody in the group. 

The slides are available on this website.

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Yosuke Mizuno lecturing about GRMHD at IAG USP. Credit: Rodrigo Nemmen.

His visit was supported by FAPESP grant 2013/10559-5.